from Civil to Inventor

The Autodesk enthusiast exile

Publish Content for Bolted Connection Part 1

Read the Introduction

The first thing that needs to be completed is kind of the core to this process.

Thread.xls

Normally we would begin in an assembly file, but for this exercise we need to go mess around with Autodesk’s artwork.  We need to edit the Thread.xls file.  You see, the Bolted Connection Generator as well as everything else in Inventor derives it’s threads from this file.  This file contains a beautiful collection of thread data, including Inch, Metric, and tapping threads.  Unfortunately the facts that bring us here today is that:

a) there is nothing available for ANSI/ASME B18.6.1 Wood screw threads; and

b) The Bolted Connection Generator only reads data from the first 3 thread tables in that file (ANSI Unified, ANSI Metric, ISO Metric).

What we need to do is to add a new row for the B18.6.1 thread for a #6 screw.  The new row needs to be added in the ANSI Unified Screw Threads Table.  Why? Because if we don’t, the Bolted Connection Generator will not use it. I know this is in bad taste, but it will get the job done.  I have no doubt that the table restrictions in the design generator is coded in XML, and that I will eventually find and exploit it.  For now, this is the only way.

Navigate to the following VISTA path:

C:\Users\Public\Documents\Autodesk\Inventor 2009\Design Data\Thread.xls.

Open this file with Excel and navigate to the ‘ANSI Unified Screw Threads’ Tab.  Select the first #6 thread entry row header, Right click and select Insert.  You should see an empty row appear. Add the data from the highlighted row in the table shown below.

image

Close and save the file.  Let’s start the next step by opening a new Inventor assembly.

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November 8, 2008 Posted by | Bolted Connection Generator, iParts | , , , , , | 1 Comment